Tuesday, August 28, 2018

The Vortex Art Gallery

Cover illustration by Bob Lizarrage
for Famous Monsters of Filmland #259 (Jan/Feb, 2012)
Welcome to the Vortex Art Gallery, a repository for artworks related to Rod Serling, The Twilight Zone, and Rod Serling’s Night Gallery. 

The first portion of the gallery is a miscellany of artworks. Beyond this is the main portion of the gallery. It is divided into three sections: The Twilight Zone, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, and The Twilight Zone revival series. Descriptions are placed above the illustrations. 

Night Gallery featured artworks created by Jaroslav Gebr, Thomas J. Wright, and Phil Vanderlei to accompany segments of the pilot film and the main series. That art can be viewed in a deluxe illustrated book that was published in 2020 by Creature Features titled Rod Serling's Night Gallery: The Art of Darkness, authored by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson, authors of Rod Serling's Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour. It comes highly recommended. 

A note on fair use: The artworks displayed are for archival and research purposes only. Images are copyright of their respective owners. 

-JP

The Cortlandt Hull Paintings

Cortlandt Hull, best-known as the creator of the Witch's Dungeon Classic Movie Museum in Connecticut, also restores amusement park attractions with fellow artist Bill Finkenstein. The two artists set their sights on restoring the carousel, originally built in 1925, located in the pavilion at George F. Johnson Recreational Park in Rod Serling's hometown of Binghamton, New York. This carousel, a fixture of Serling's childhood, was recreated on The Twilight Zone in the Serling-scripted first season episode, "Walking Distance." Hull and Finkenstein restored the George F. Johnson Recreational Park Carousel to closely resemble the carousel featured in "Walking Distance." In addition, Hull painted the running boards of the carousel with striking images depicting memorable moments from The Twilight Zone, including a tribute to "Walking Distance." 










Illustration by Marcus Hamilton for a special Rod Serling and The Twilight Zone section of Starlog #15 (August, 1978). Note the use of an early version of Serling's first season narration. 


Illustrations by Kevin Brockschmidt for "Driving Rod Serling," a memoir by Robert R. Rees featured in issue #203 of Starlog (June, 1994). 




Advertisement for the The Twilight Zone CBS Video Library, circa 1988; artist unknown.



Original illustration by Harley Brown for the cover of FilmFax #119 (2008), which featured an interview with Del Reisman, an associate producer on The Twilight Zone. 


Magazine advertisement circa 1972 for prints of the paintings featured on Rod Serling's Night Gallery. 


U.S. postage stamp designed by Carl T. Herrman and released in August of 2009 as part of the Early TV Memories commemorative stamps set. 


Illustration by Shag (Josh Agle). 



Scholastic Scope Magazine:
Scholastic Scope is a classroom magazine published by Scholastic Books that is focused on introducing students to great works of literature. The featured works were often adapted or abridged for younger readers. The publication has several times featured the work of Rod Serling, along with issues devoted to other writers of interest such as Ray Bradbury and Richard Matheson. 

Some issues of the magazine are scanned on microfilm and available to view at the Internet Archive, from which these images are shared. The most interesting issue is a special Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone issue for March 22, 1979, featuring a cover and interior illustrations by Lance R. Miyamoto for The Twilight Zone episodes "The Midnight Sun," "The Big Tall Wish," and "Back There."










An earlier issue of the magazine, for Dec 2, 1975, featured Rod Serling's "The Different Ones," which was dramatized for the second season of Night Gallery on Dec 29, 1971. Illustrations by John Cayea. 




The issue for Jan 20, 1977 featured Rod Serling's "The Rack," which was dramatized on The United States Steel Hour on April 12, 1955. Illustrations by Frances Jetter. 





The issue for April 17, 1980 featured Rod Serling's teleplay "I Shot an Arrow Into the Air," which Serling wrote based on an idea by Madelon Champion. It was dramatized for the first season of The Twilight Zone, originally broadcast Jan 15, 1960. Illustrations by Chris Spollen. 




Uncredited illustrations for Rod Serling's "Noon on Doomsday" (Sightlines: Seven Dramatic Experiences, ed. David Perlman, Masha Buell (Irwin Publishing, 1990)). "Noon on Doomsday" was produced for The United States Steel Hour for April, 25, 1956. Several Twilight Zone performers appeared in the drama, including Philip Abbott, Frank Overton, Albert Salmi, Everett Sloane, Edgar Stehli, and Jack Warden. "Noon on Doomsday" was also produced for Armchair Theatre for July 6, 1958. 
 




The Twilight Zone (1959-1964): 

Illustration by Carl Koch for "Perchance to Dream” by Charles Beaumont (Playboy, Oct, 1958). Beaumont adapted his story for the first season episode directed by Robert Florey, starring Richard Conte, John Larch, and Suzanne Lloyd, broadcast Nov 27, 1959.



Illustrations by “Williams” for “What You Need” by Lewis Padgett (Henry Kuttner & C.L. Moore) (Astounding Science Fiction, October, 1945). The story was first adapted for television in 1952 for Tales of Tomorrow and later adapted on The Twilight Zone by Rod Serling, directed by Alvin Ganzer, broadcast Dec 25, 1959.




Two views of "Third From the Sun" by Richard Matheson. Illustration by Paul CallĂ© (Galaxy Science Fiction, Oct, 1950). Illustrations by Steve Moore for Adventure and Suspense, ed. Michael Spring (1987). The story was adapted by Rod Serling for the first season episode directed by Richard L. Bare, starring Fritz Weaver and Edward Andrews, broadcast Jan 8, 1960.







Illustrations by Stan Olson for "I Shot an Arrow Into the Air" by Rod Serling (Starwalk: New Dimensions in Reading (Silver Burdett Ginn, 1993)). Serling's teleplay was based on an idea by Madelon Champion and produced for the first season episode directed by Stuart Rosenberg, broadcast January 15, 1960.  










Two views of "The Hitch-Hiker" by Lucille Fletcher. Illustration by Mike Eagle for McDougal, Littell Literature: Green Level (1982). Illustrations by Douglas Snow from Adventures for Readers: Book Two (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985). Rod Serling adapted Fletcher's 1941 radio play for the first season episode starring Inger Stevens, directed by Alvin Ganzer, broadcast January 22, 1960. 









W.E. Terry’s illustration for “Elegy” by Charles Beaumont, from the February, 1953 issue of Imagination. “Elegy” was adapted by Beaumont for the first season episode directed by Douglas Heyes, broadcast Feb 19, 1960.



Eight views of "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street" by Rod Serling:
 
1.) Photographic illustrations by Charles Rotkin and Marion Bernstein for Unknown Worlds (Holt’s Impact, 1969)
2.) Illustrations by Charles Robinson from Great Waves Breaking (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1977). 
3.) Illustration by George Hamblin for Senses (The Signal Series) (Scott, Foresman and Co., 1977)
4.) Illustrations by Joseph Warner for Focus on Literature: Action (Houghton Mifflin, 1978)
5.) Uncredited illustrations for Purpose in Literature (Scott, Foresman and Co., 1982)
6.) Illustrations by Charles Reid for Worlds Beyond (Silver Burdett Ginn, 1993)
7.) Illustrations by John Nickle for Signatures: Hidden Treasures (Harcourt Brace, 1997)
8.) Illustrations by Mark Riedy for Literature and Language Arts (Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2003). 

The first season episode was directed by Ronald Winston and broadcast on March 4, 1960.

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Illustration by Leo Summers for “Brothers Beyond the Void” by Paul W. Fairman (Fantastic Adventures, March, 1952). The story was adapted by Rod Serling, as “People Are Alike All Over,” for the first season episode directed by Mitchell Leisen, broadcast March 25, 1960.



Four views of Truman Capote's 1945 story "Miriam." Illustration by David Stone from the Fall, 1952 issue of Fantastic. Illustration by Hal Frenck for Encounters: Themes and Writers Series (McGraw-Hill, 1973). Illustration by Leo & Diane Dillon from the 1982 Reader's Digest anthology Great Short Tales of Mystery and Terror. Illustrations by Martin Salisbury for Supernatural Stories, edited by William Mayne (1995). Capote's story inspired Rod Serling's first season episode "Nightmare as a Child," directed by Alvin Ganzer, broadcast April 29, 1960. 











Two views of "The Chaser" by John Collier. Illustration by Charles Molina for Tales of Mystery and the Unknown (1976). Illustration by Meryl Henderson for Tales of Mystery and Suspense, edited by Theodore W. Hipple (Allyn and Bacon, 1977). The story was adapted for the first season of The Twilight Zone by writer Robert Presnell, Jr., directed by Douglas Heyes, broadcast May 13, 1960.




Illustration by David Klein for “And Now I’m Waiting” by Richard Matheson (Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, March/April, 1983). The story is Matheson’s original treatment for the first season episode “A World of His Own,” starring Keenan Wynn, directed by Ralph Nelson, broadcast July 1, 1960.



Cover illustration by Kelly Forbes for Fangoria #301 (March, 2011), depicting the devil-headed fortune-telling machine from Richard Matheson's second season episode, "Nick of Time." The episode starred William Shatner and Patricia Breslin, directed by Richard L. Bare, broadcast November 18, 1960. 


Three views of "Back There" by Rod Serling. Illustrations by Jim Cummins for
Journeys: Cascade (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1982). Illustrations by Mike Eagle for A Road to Travel (Silver, Burdett & Ginn, 1985). Illustrations by Hal Frenck for Literature, ed. Tom Wolpert, Lee Bennett Hopkins (Random House, 1986). The teleplay was produced for the second season of The Twilight Zone, broadcast Jan 13, 1961.























Cover illustration by Eppo Doeve (as by J.F. Doeve), illustrating the second season Twilight Zone episode “The Whole Truth” for a 1966 Dutch edition of Rod Serling’s Stories from The Twilight Zone. The title translates as: Stories from the Dusk.  



Three cover illustrations inspired by Rod Serling’s second season episode “The Odyssey of Flight 33.” More Stories from the Twilight Zone (Bantam Books, 1969 & 1982) artists unknown. Urania #1151 (1991), an Italian reprint, with a cover by Vicente Segrelles.









Three views of Anton Chekhov's 1889 story "The Bet," which inspired Rod Serling's second season Twilight Zone episode "The Silence," broadcast April 28, 1961. Illustration by Karin Kretshmann (Stories of Surprise and Wonder, ed. Robert R. Potter, 1979). Illustrations by Alice Abramowitz (Gateway to Mystery Stories, ed. Elayne Sidley, 1978). Illustrations by Phero Thomas for Adventures in Appreciation (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985).  












 A bizarre illustration by "Remington" for “Traumerei” by Charles Beaumont (Infinity Science Fiction, Feb, 1956). The story was adapted by Beaumont, as “Shadow Play,” for the second season episode starring Dennis Weaver, directed by John Brahm, broadcast May 5, 1961.



Illustrations by Kim Zimmerman for “Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?” by Rod Serling, from the publication of Serling’s teleplay in the Feb, 1986 issue of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine. The episode was directed by Montgomery Pittman and originally aired on May 26, 1961. 



Illustrations by Gerard Quinn for “It’s a Good Life” by Jerome Bixby, from its first UK appearance in Science Fantasy, v 6, #16 (1955). The story was adapted by Rod Serling for the third season episode directed by James Sheldon, broadcast Nov 3, 1961.






Two views of "The Valley Was Still" by Manly Wade Wellman, adapted as "Still Valley" by Rod Serling for the third season episode directed by James Sheldon, broadcast Nov 24, 1961. Illustration by Harry Ferman (Weird Tales, Aug, 1939). Illustration by Lee Brown Coye for Worse Things Waiting (Carcosa, 1973).






Illustrations by Leo Summers for “The Jungle” by Charles Beaumont (IF, Dec, 1954). Beaumont adapted his story for the 3rd season episode directed by William Claxton, starring John Dehner, broadcast December 1, 1961.





Seven views of “To Serve Man” by Damon Knight, adapted by Rod Serling for the third season of The Twilight Zone, directed by Richard L. Bare, broadcast March 2, 1962. Illustration by David Stone (Galaxy Science Fiction, Nov, 1950). Illustrations by David Kingham from To See Ourselves (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1977). Cover illustration for The Best of Damon Knight by Richard Corben (1976). Cover illustration for The Best of Damon Knight by Carl Lundgren (1980). Cover illustration by Tommy Soloski (1980). Illustrations by Tom Leonard for Scope English Anthology (Scholastic, 1988). Illustration by David Wyatt from The Young Oxford Book of Aliens, ed. Dennis Pepper (1998).  






















Illustration by Ray Houlihan for “Little Girl Lost” by Richard Matheson (Amazing Stories, Oct/Nov, 1953). The story was adapted by Matheson for the third season episode starring Robert Sampson & Charles Aidman, directed by Paul Stewart, broadcast March 16, 1962.



Illustrations by Jim Harter for “The Changing of the Guard” by Anne Serling, a prose adaptation of Rod Serling’s third season teleplay, from the Jan/Feb, 1985 issue of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine. The original episode was directed by Robert Ellis Miller, starring Donald Pleasence, broadcast June 1, 1962.





W.E. Terry’s illustration depicting a shocking moment in “The Man Who Made Himself” by Charles Beaumont (aka “In His Image”) (Imagination, Feb, 1957). Beaumont adapted the story for the fourth season episode directed by Perry Lafferty, broadcast Jan 3, 1963.



Illustration by Ed Emshwiller for “Death Ship” by Richard Matheson (Fantastic Story, March, 1953). Matheson adapted the story for the fourth season episode starring Jack Klugman & Ross Martin, directed by Don Medford, broadcast Feb 7, 1963.



Illustration by Enoch Sharpe for “The Devil You Say?” by Charles Beaumont (Amazing Stories, Jan, 1951). Beaumont adapted his story as “Printer’s Devil” for the fourth season episode directed by Ralph Senesky, starring Burgess Meredith, broadcast Feb 28, 1963. 



Illustrations by Frank Kramer for Malcolm Jameson’s “Blind Alley” (Unknown Worlds, June, 1943). The story was adapted by Rod Serling as “Of Late I Think of Cliffordville” for the fourth season, directed by David Lowell Rich, broadcast April 11, 1963.






Illustrations for Richard Matheson’s “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” (1962), which Matheson adapted for the fifth season Twilight Zone episode starring William Shatner, directed by Richard Donner, broadcast October 11, 1963. Mysterious Air Stories (1986), cover artist unknown. Cover art by “Ravenwood” for Matheson’s 2002 collection Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (Tor Books). Illustration by Chris Roberts for Rue Morgue #35 (Sept/Oct, 2003). Illustration by Rick Melton for The Dark Side #181 (2017). 







Illustration by David Christiana for the Dec, 1982 issue of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine which contained the first publication of Jerry Sohl’s fifth season teleplay “Living Doll,” at this time credited solely to Charles Beaumont. The episode featured Telly Salavas directed by Richard C. Sarafian, broadcast Nov 1, 1963.



Two views of Charles Beaumont's "The Beautiful People" (aka "The Beautiful Woman"). Illustration by Bob Martin for the Sept, 1952 issue of IF, and illustration by Gerard Quinn for Nebula Science Fiction #3 (1953). The story was adapted by John Tomerlin as “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” for the fifth season episode starring Collin Wilcox, Suzy Parker, and Richard Long, directed by Abner Biberman. Originally broadcast Jan 24, 1964.





Original magazine illustration for Richard Matheson's "Sorry, Right Number" by Art Sussman (Beyond Fantasy Fiction, Nov, 1953). Matheson adapted the story as "Night Call" for the fifth season episode starring Gladys Cooper, directed by Jacques Tourneur, broadcast Feb 7, 1964.



Six views of Ambrose Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" (1890). Illustration by Lynd Ward for The Haunted Omnibus, ed. Alexander Laing (1937). Illustration by Paul Landacre from Tales of Soliders & Civilians (Heritage Press, 1971). Illustration by Hal Frenck for Encounters: Themes and Writers Series (McGraw-Hill, 1973). Illustration by Ferebe Streett from The Stories and Fables of Ambrose Bierce (1977). Uncredited illustration for Super Book of Ghost Stories, ed. Leonard J. Matthews (Hamlyn, 1977). Illustrations by C. Mitchell from United States in Literature (Scott, Foresman and Co., 1979). A 1962 Academy Award-winning French short film adaptation of the story was broadcast during The Twilight Zone's 5th season on Feb 28, 1964.
















Two views of George Clayton Johnson’s “Sea Change,” first published in the Oct, 1981 issue of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, with an illustration by Robert Morello. The story was reprinted in the first issue of Night Cry (1984) with an illustration by D.W. Miller. Clayton Johnson originally sold the story to The Twilight Zone during the second season but production on the episode was halted when the series sponsor was apprehensive about the grisly subject matter of the tale.




Illustrations from the June, 1982 issue of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine which accompanied the first publication of Richard Matheson's unproduced 5th season Twilight Zone teleplay "The Doll." Cover by Malcolm McNeill, interior art by Perry A. Realo. The script was later made into a 1st season episode of Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories starring John Lithgow, who won an Emmy Award for his performance, directed by Phil Joanou, broadcast May 4, 1986.









Tom O’Sullivan’s illustrations for Ray Bradbury’s “Here There Be Tygers” (1951) (Amazing Stories, Apr/May, 1953 (reprint)). Bradbury adapted the story for The Twilight Zone but it was never filmed. Bradbury later adapted the tale for The Ray Bradbury Theater, directed by John Laing, broadcast Nov 30, 1990.




Rod Serling’s Night Gallery (1969-1973)

Two views of Fritz Leiber's "The Dead Man." Illustration by Charles A. Kennedy from Weird Tales (Nov, 1950) & by R.W. Smethurst for a reprint in the April, 1958 issue of Phantom magazine. The story was adapted for the first episode of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer/director Douglas Heyes, broadcast Dec 16, 1970. 





Illustrations by Edd Cartier for C.M. Kornbluth’s “The Little Black Bag” (Astounding SF, July, 1950). The story was adapted for the 1st season of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Rod Serling & director Jeannot Szwarc, broadcast Dec 23, 1970.







Illustration by Karin Kretshmann for “The House” by AndrĂ© Maurois (Stories of Surprise and Wonder, ed. Robert R. Potter, 1979). The story was adapted for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Rod Serling & director John Astin (Dec 30, 1970).




Four views of “The Shadows on the Wall” by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. Illustrations by Peter Newell for Freeman's The Wind in the Rose Bush and Other Stories of the Supernatural (1903). Illustration by Lee Brown Coye for Who Knocks? ed. August Derleth (1946). Illustration by Barbara Kiwak for Classic Ghost Stories II (Lowell House, 1998). Illustration by Antoni Sobecki for a Polish edition of Freeman's Lost Ghosts (2006). The story was adapted, as “Certain Shadows on the Wall,” for Night Gallery by writer Rod Serling & director Jeff Corey (Dec 30, 1970). 









Illustration by Lawrence Mynott for "The Doll" by Algernon Blackwood (Tales from Beyond the Grave, Octopus Books, 1982). The story, first published in 1946, was adapted by Rod Serling for the first season of Night Gallery, directed by Rudi Dorn, broadcast January 13, 1971.


Three views of Margaret St. Clair's "The Boy Who Predicted Earthquakes." Illustration by W. Winter from the story's original publication in Maclean’s, June 15, 1950. Illustrations by Patric Fourshe from Diversity (Houghton Mifflin, 1974). Illustrations by Joe Van Severen from Children of the Future, 1984. The story was adapted for Night Gallery by Rod Serling & director John Badham, broadcast Sept 15, 1971.














Original illustrations by Paul Orban for A.E. van Vogt’s story “The Witch” (Unknown Worlds, Feb, 1943), adapted for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery as “Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay” by writer Alvin Sapinsley and director William Hale, originally broadcast Sept 29, 1971.




Illustration by Newton Alfred for Manly Wade Wellman’s “The Devil Is Not Mocked” (Unknown Worlds, June, 1943). The story was adapted for the second season of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer/director Gene Kearney, originally broadcast Oct 27, 1971.



Illustration by Hannes Bok for Margaret St. Clair’s “Brenda” (Weird Tales, March, 1954). The story was adapted for the 2nd season of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Douglas Heyes & director Allen Reisner, broadcast Nov 2, 1971.



Illustration by Hugh Rankin for H.P. Lovecraft’s “Pickman’s Model” (Weird Tales, Oct, 1927). The story was adapted by writer Alvin Sapinsley & director Jack Laird for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, broadcast Dec 1, 1971.




Two views of Alice-Mary Schnirring’s “The Dear Departed.” Illustration by A.R. Tilburne for Weird Tales, May, 1944, and illustration by Lee Brown Coye for Who Knocks? ed. August Derleth (1946). The story was adapted for the 2nd season of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Rod Serling & director Jeff Corey, broadcast Dec 1, 1971. 




Two views of H.P. Lovecraft's "Cool Air" (1928). Illustration by Harry Ferman for Weird Tales (Sept, 1939) & the final page of an adaptation by Bernie Wrightson for Creepy #62 (Jan, 1975). The story was adapted for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Rod Serling & director Jeannot Szwarc, broadcast Dec 8, 1971.











Three views of Rod Serling's "The Different Ones." Illustrations by John Cannizzo (Globe Literature, 1982); illustrations by Jim Ludtke for Adventure and Suspense, ed. Michael Spring (1987); illustrations by Jon Friedman from Scope English Anthology (Scholastic, 1988). Serling’s teleplay was produced for the second season of Night Gallery, directed by John Meredyth Lucas, broadcast Dec 29, 1971.





















Uncredited illustration for August Derleth's "Logoda's Heads" (Strange Stories, April, 1939). It was adapted for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Robert Bloch & director Jeannot Szwarc, broadcast Dec 29, 1971. 


Illustration by Russell Kirk for his 1952 story “Sorworth Place” (The Surly Sullen Bell, 1962). The story was adapted as “The Ghost of Sorworth Place” on Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Alvin Sapinsley & director Ralph Senensky (Jan 19, 1972).



Illustration by Hugh Rankin for Hazel Heald’s (and H.P. Lovecraft’s) “Out of the Eons” (Weird Tales, April, 1935). It was adapted as “Last Rites for a Dead Druid” on Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Alvin Sapinsley & director Jeannot Szwarc, broadcast Jan 26, 1972.





Uncredited illustration for Clark Ashton Smith’s “The Return of the Sorcerer” (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, Sept, 1931). It was adapted for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Halsted Welles & director Jeannot Szwarc, starring Vincent Price (Sept 24, 1972).



Illustration for Fritz Leiber’s “The Girl with the Hungry Eyes” (Avon, 1949); artist unknown. The story was adapted for the 3rd season of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Robert Malcolm Young & director John Badham, broadcast Oct 1, 1972. 



Illustration by Virgil Finlay for J. Wesley Rosenquest’s “The Secret of the Vault” (Weird Tales, May, 1938). It was adapted as “You Can Come Up Now, Mrs. Millikan” for Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Rod Serling & director John Badham, broadcast Nov 12, 1972.




Illustration by Hugh Rankin for Everil Worrell’s “The Canal” (Weird Tales, Dec, 1927). The story was adapted as “Death on a Barge” for the 3rd season of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery by writer Halsted Welles & director Leonard Nimoy, broadcast March 4, 1973. 




The Twilight Zone (1985-1989)


Illustrations by John Storey for Harlan Ellison’s “Shatterday” (Science Fiction Monthly, Aug, 1975). The story was adapted for the first episode of The Twilight Zone revival series by writer Alan Brennert and director Wes Craven, broadcast Sept 27, 1985.



Three views of Henry Slesar's "Examination Day." Illustration by Leon Bishop for the February, 1958 issue of Playboy. Illustration by Charles Molina from Stories Beyond Time and Space, ed. Robert R. Potter, 1978. Illustration by Peter Horvath from Beware! R.L. Stine Picks His Favorite Scary Stories, 2002. The story was adapted for the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Philip DeGuere and director Paul Lynch, broadcast November 1, 1985. 










Illustration by Peter Farrow for William M. Lee’s “A Message from Charity” (Yankee Witches, ed. Charles G. Waugh, Martin H. Greenberg, Frank D. McSherry, Jr., 1988). The story was originally published in the Nov, 1967 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and adapted for the first season of the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Alan Brennert and director Paul Lynch, broadcast Nov 1, 1985.


Illustration by Kent Bash for Harlan Ellison’s “Paladin of the Lost Hour” (Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, Dec, 1985). Ellison adapted the story for the revival Twilight Zone series, starring Danny Kaye, directed by Gilbert Cates, broadcast Nov 8, 1985.



Illustration by Douglas Chaffee for William F. Wu’s “Wong’s Lost and Found Emporium” (Amazing SF, May, 1983). The story was adapted for the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Alan Brennert & director Paul Lynch, broadcast Nov 22, 1985.



Illustration by John Giunta for Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Star" (Infinity Science Fiction, Nov, 1955). “The Star” was adapted for The Twilight Zone revival series by writer Alan Brennert and director Gerd Oswald. It starred Fritz Weaver and was originally broadcast Dec 20, 1985.




Illustrations by Edd Cartier for Theodore Sturgeon’s “Yesterday Was Monday” (Unknown Fantasy Fiction, June, 1941). The story was loosely adapted as “A Matter of Minutes” on the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Rockne S. O’Bannon & director Sheldon Larry, broadcast Jan 24, 1986.








Illustrations by Allen Koszowski for Stephen King’s “Gramma” (Weirdbook 19, Spring, 1984). The story was adapted for the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Harlan Ellison & director Bradford May, broadcast Feb 14, 1986.





Illustrations by Frank Borth for Roger Zelazny’s “The Last Defender of Camelot” (Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine, Summer, 1979). The story was adapted for the revival Twilight Zone series by writer George R.R. Martin and director Jeannot Szwarc, originally broadcast April 11, 1986.















Illustration by Tom Beecham for Theodore Sturgeon’s “Saucer of Loneliness” (Galaxy SF, Feb, 1953). It was adapted under its original title, “A Saucer of Loneliness,” for the revival Twilight Zone series by writer David Gerrold and director John Hancock, broadcast Sept 27, 1986.



Illustration by Michael Wm. Kaluta for George R.R. Martin’s “The Road Less Traveled” (Dreamsongs volume II, 2007). Martin’s teleplay was dramatized on the revival Twilight Zone series by director Wes Craven, starring Cliff De Young, broadcast December 18, 1986.


 Illustration by Anna Rich for Parke Godwin’s “Influencing the Hell Out of Time and Teresa Golowitz” (Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, Jan, 1982). The story was adapted as “Time and Teresa Golowitz” for the second season of the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Alan Brennert and director Shelley Levinson, originally broadcast July 10, 1987.




Illustration by David Levinson for Alan Brennert’s “Voices in the Earth” (Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, Oct, 1987), from a prose adaptation of Brennert’s original teleplay which aired on the revival Twilight Zone series, directed by Curtis Harrington, broadcast July 10, 1987. 



Illustrations by Frank Kelly Freas for Tom Godwin’s “The Cold Equations” (Astounding SF, Aug, 1954). The story was adapted for the revival Twilight Zone series by writer Alan Brennert and director Martin Lavut, originally broadcast Jan 7, 1989.








Illustration by Neal Adams for Harlan Ellison’s “Crazy as a Soup Sandwich,” from NOW Comics The Twilight Zone #1 (1991). Ellison’s teleplay was filmed for the third season of the revival Twilight Zone, directed by Paul Lynch, broadcast April 1, 1989.



Illustrations by Trevor Irvin for Donald E. Westlake’s “Nackles” (Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone Magazine, Feb, 1987). The story was adapted for the revival Twilight Zone series by Harlan Ellison but never filmed due to network interference, which caused Ellison to resign his position as Creative Consultant for the series.







Bonus Illustrations:

Illustration by Jayem Wilcox for “The Return of Andrew Bentley” by August Derleth & Mark Schorer (Weird Tales, Sept, 1933). Richard Matheson adapted the story for the second season of Boris Karloff’s Thriller, broadcast Dec 11, 1961.


Illustration by E.T. (Broeck) Steadman for Donald Olson’s “The Tear Collector” (Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, Oct, 1981). The story was adapted for the 1st season Tales from the Darkside episode written by Geoffrey Loftus, directed by John Drimmer, broadcast Feb 24, 1985.





Illustration by Marty Blake for Haskell Barkin’s “All a Clone by the Telephone” (Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, Dec, 1981). Barkin adapted his story for the 1st season episode of Tales from the Darkside directed by Frank De Palma, broadcast Jan 20, 1985.




Artist Marcus Hamilton's tribute to Rod Serling which originally appeared in issue #15 of Starlog magazine (Aug, 1978), and was reused in issue #203 (June, 1994). Notice the early version of Serling's opening narration, later slightly revised for the first season opening sequence.




Illustration by J.K. Potter for Robert Bloch’s “The Chaney Legacy” (Night Cry, Fall, 1986). The story was adapted for the television anthology series Monsters by writer John Harrison (as John Sutherland) and director Jeffrey Wolf, broadcast Dec 3, 1988.




Illustrations by James Stonebraker for George Clayton Johnson’s story, “Your Three Minutes Are Up,” a moving tribute to Twilight Zone writer Charles Beaumont from the June, 1989 issue of Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine. This was a Beaumont tribute issue and the final issue of the magazine.